Did You Know These Top 500+ Interesting Quotes By Steve Jobs?

Did You Know These Top 500+ Interesting Quotes By Steve Jobs Quotes Curated by Factober

Written by Vishal for Factober

FACTOBER KNOWLEDGE & INSPIRATION

October 12, 2020

Steve Jobs Quotes

Steve Jobs is one of the most popular technology entrepreneurs. He is the same person who started the real computer revolution. Today’s full-grown computer market is the fruit of Steve’s hard work. Read these 500+ interesting Steve Jobs quotes and see how amazing his thoughts were.

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  1. A lot of people in our industry haven’t had very diverse experiences. So they don’t have enough dots to connect, and they end up with very linear solutions without a broad perspective on the problem. The broader one’s understanding of the human experience, the better design we will have.
  2. A lot of these songs are encoded by seven year olds, and they don’t do a great jobWorst of all it’s stealingIt’s best not to mess with karma.
  3. A lot of times, people don’t know what they want until you show it to them
  4. A man will be stab every single day big negative people who slowly tries to grab his dreams and throw it in trash bin, although its up to him to be determined and surround himself to be with good people that respect him. Michael Akinniyi
  5. After a week you start to feel fantastic. You get a ton of vitality from not having to digest all this food. I was in great shape. I felt I could get up and walk to San Francisco anytime I wanted.
  6. After the applause, he used the quotations book to make a more subtle point, about his reality distortion field. The quote he chose was from Lewis Carroll’s Through the Looking Glass. After Alice laments that no matter how hard she tries she can’t believe impossible things, the White Queen retorts, Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.” Especially from the front rows, there was a roar of knowing laughter. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  7. Again, you can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something – your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life.
  8. Again, you can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backward. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something — your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life.
  9. Al turned me on to this brilliant guy named Rod Holt, who was a chain-smoking Marxist who had been through many marriages and was an expert on everything.
  10. All of my working-class parents’ savings were being spent on my college tuition. I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life and no idea how college was going to help me figure it out. And here I was spending all of the money my parents had saved their entire life. So I decided to drop out and trust that it would all work out okay.
  11. Almost everything–all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure–these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important.
  12. Almost everything…all external expectations…all pride…all fear of embarrassment or failure…these things just fall away in the face of death….leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking that you have something to lose. You are already naked…there is no reason not to follow your heart.
  13. And it comes from saying no to 1,000 things to make sure we don’t get on the wrong track or try to do too much. We’re always thinking about new markets we could enter, but it’s only by saying no that you can concentrate on the things that are really important.
  14. And it’s a way of expressing to the rest of our species our deep appreciation. So, we need to be true to who we are and remember what’s really important to us. That’s what’s going to keep Apple Apple: is if we keep us us.
  15. And that’s what a computer is to me. What a computer is to me is it’s the most remarkable tool that we’ve ever come up with, and it’s the equivalent of a bicycle for our minds.
  16. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do…. Don’t settle
  17. And you never meet the people, you never shake their hands, you never hear their story or tell yours, but somehow, in the act of making something with a great deal of care and love, something is transmitted there.
  18. As individuals, people are inherently good. I have a somewhat more pessimistic view of people in groups. And I remain extremely concerned when I see what’s happening in our country, which is in many ways the luckiest place in the world. We don’t seem to be excited about making our country a better place for our kids.
  19. As Osborne famously declared, “Adequacy is sufficient. All else is superfluous.” Jobs found that approach to be morally appalling, and he spent days making fun of Osborne. “This guy just doesn’t get it,” Jobs repeatedly railed as he wandered the Apple corridors. “He’s not making art, he’s making shit. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  20. Asked about the fact that Apple’s iTunes software for Windows computers was extremely popular, Jobs joked, ‘It’s like giving a glass of ice water to somebody in hell. Walter Isaacson
  21. At Apple, people are putting in 18-hour days. We attract a different type of person—a person who doesn’t want to wait five or ten years to have someone take a giant risk on him or her. Someone who really wants to get in a little over his head and make a little dent in the universe. We are aware that we are doing something significant. We’re here at the beginning of it and we’re able to shape how it goes. Everyone here has the sense that right now is one of those moments when we are influencing the future.
  22. At Apple, people are putting in 18-hour days. We attract a different type of person—a person who doesn’t want to wait five or ten years to have someone take a giant risk on him or her. Someone who really wants to get in a little over his head and make a little dent in the universe. We are aware that we are doing something significant. We’re here at the beginning of it and we’re able to shape how it goes. Everyone here has the sense that right now is one of those moments when we are influencing the future. Steve Jobs, I, Steve: Steve Jobs In His Own Words
  23. Back then, people didn’t have unlisted numbers. So I looked up Bill Hewlett in Palo Alto and called him at home. And he answered and chatted with me for twenty minutes. He got me the parts, but he also got me a job in the plant where they made frequency counters. My dad would drive me in the morning and pick me up in the evening.
  24. Be a yardstick of quality. Some people aren’t used to an environment where excellence is expected.
  25. Being the richest man in the cemetery doesn’t matter to me. Going to bed at night saying we’ve done something wonderful, that’s what matters to me.
  26. Beyond All the Motivational Quotes, Songs And Mantras…
  27. Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Einstein, Darwin were like you and me before they started dreaming. They dreamt and conquered. M.Rehan Behleem
  28. Both my parts got me. They felt a lot of responsibility once they sensed that I was special. They found ways to keep feeding me stuff and putting me in better schools. They were willing to defer to my needs.
  29. Bottom line is, I didn’t return to Apple to make a fortune. I’ve been very lucky in my life and already have one. When I was 25, my net worth was $100 million or so. I decided then that I wasn’t going to let it ruin my life. There’s no way you could ever spend it all, and I don’t view wealth as something that validates my intelligence.
  30. Brad Bird remembers a meeting during the making of The Incredibles, soon after he joined the studio, when Steve hurt his feelings by saying that some of the Incredibles artwork looked “kind of Saturday morning”––a reference to the low-budget cartoons that Hanna-Barbera and others produced. “In my world, that’s kind of like saying, ‘Your mama sleeps around,'” Brad recalls. “I was seething. When the meeting ended, I went over to Andrew and said, ‘Man, Steve just said something that really pissed me off.’ And Andrew, without even asking what it was, said, ‘Only one thing?'” Brad came to understand that Steve was speaking not as a critic but as the ultimate advocate. Too often, animated superheroes had been made on the cheap and looked that way, too––on that Steve and Brad could agree. The Incredibles, he was implying, had to reach higher. Ed Catmull, Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration
  31. But innovation comes from people meeting up in the hallways or calling each other at 10:30 at night with a new idea, or because they realized something that shoots holes in how we’ve been thinking about a problem.
  32. Can I have my job back?
  33. Coming back after seven months in Indian villages, I saw the craziness of the Western world as well as its capacity for rational thought. If you just sit and observe, you will see how restless your mind is. If you try to calm it, it only makes it worse, but over time it does calm, and when it does, there’s room to hear more subtle things – that’s when your intuition starts to blossom and you start to see things more clearly and be in the present more. Your mind just slows down, and you see a tremendous expanse in the moment. You see so much more than you could see before. It’s a discipline; you have to practice it.
  34. Coming back to America was, for me, much more of a cultural shock than going to India. The people in the Indian countryside don’t use their intellect like we do, they use their intuition instead, and their intuition is far more developed than in the rest of the world. Intuition is a very powerful thing, more powerful than intellect, in my opinion. That’s had a big impact on my work.
  35. Coming back to America was, for me, much more of a cultural shock than going to India. The people in the Indian countryside don’t use their intellect like we do, they use their intuition instead, and their intuition is far more developed than in the rest of the world. Intuition is a very powerful thing, more powerful than intellect, in my opinion. That’s had a big impact on my work. Western rational thought is not an innate human characteristic; it is learned and is the great achievement of Western civilization. In the villages of India, they never learned it. They learned something else, which is in some ways just as valuable but in other ways is not. That’s the power of intuition and experiential wisdom. Coming back after seven months in Indian villages, I saw the craziness of the Western world as well as its capacity for rational thought. If you just sit and observe, you will see how restless your mind is. If you try to calm it, it only makes it worse, but over time it does calm, and when it does, there’s room to hear more subtle things—that’s when your intuition starts to blossom and you start to see things more clearly and be in the present more. Your mind just slows down, and you see a tremendous expanse in the moment. You see so much more than you could see before. It’s a discipline; you have to practice it. Zen has been a deep influence in my life ever since. At one point I was thinking about going to Japan and trying to get into the Eihei-ji monastery, but my spiritual advisor urged me to stay here. He said there is nothing over there that isn’t here, and he was correct. I learned the truth of the Zen saying that if you are willing to travel around the world to meet a teacher, one will appear next door. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  36. Computers are like a bicycle for the mind. Steve Jobs
  37. Computers themselves, and software yet to be developed, will revolutionize the way we learn. Steve Jobs, Steve Jobs Graduation Speech
  38. Creation is messy. You want genius, you get madness; two sides of the same coin.
  39. Creativity is just connecting things.
  40. Creativity is just connecting things. When you ask creative people how they did something, they feel a little guilty because they didn’t really do it, they just saw something. It seemed obvious to them after a while.
  41. Creativity is just connecting things. When you ask creative people how they did something, they feel a little guilty because they didn’t really do it, they just saw something. It seemed obvious to them after a while.
  42. Creativity is just connecting things. When you ask creative people how they did something, they feel a little guilty because they didn’t really do it, they just saw something. It seemed obvious to them after a while. That’s because they were able to connect experiences they’ve had and synthesize new things. And the reason they were able to do that was that they’ve had more experiences or they have thought more about their experiences than other people. Unfortunately, that’s too rare a commodity. A lot of people in our industry haven’t had very diverse experiences. So they don’t have enough dots to connect, and they end up with very linear solutions without a broad perspective on the problem. The broader one’s understanding of the human experience, the better design we will have.
  43. Customers don’t know what they want until we’ve shown them. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  44. Death is the destination we all share, no one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be because death is very likely the single best invention of life.
  45. Deciding what not to do is as important as deciding what to do.
  46. Design is not limited to fancy new gadgets. Our family just bought a new washing machine and dryer. We didn’t have a very good one so we spent a little time looking at them. It turns out that the Americans make washers and dryers all wrong. The Europeans make them much better – but they take twice as long to do clothes! It turns out that they wash them with about a quarter as much water and your clothes end up with a lot less detergent on them. Most important, they don’t trash your clothes. They use a lot less soap, a lot less water, but they come out much cleaner, much softer, and they last a lot longer. We spent some time in our family talking about what’s the trade-off we want to make. We ended up talking a lot about design, but also about the values of our family. Did we care most about getting our wash done in an hour versus an hour and a half? Or did we care most about our clothes feeling really soft and lasting longer? Did we care about using a quarter of the water? We spent about two weeks talking about this every night at the dinner table. We’d get around to that old washer-dryer discussion. And the talk was about design. We ended up opting for these Miele appliances, made in Germany. They’re too expensive, but that’s just because nobody buys them in this country. They are really wonderfully made and one of the few products we’ve bought over the last few years that we’re all really happy about. These guys really thought the process through. They did such a great job designing these washers and dryers. I got more thrill out of them than I have out of any piece of high tech in years.
  47. Despite being a denizen of the digital world, or maybe because he knew all too well its isolating potential, Jobs was a strong believer in face-to-face meetings. “There’s a temptation in our networked age to think that ideas can be developed by email and iChat,” he said. “That’s crazy. Walter Isaacson
  48. Details matter, it’s worth waiting to get it right.
  49. Did you think of this?
  50. Do you want to spend the rest of your life selling sugared water or do you want a chance to change the world?
  51. Don’t be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other people’s thinking.
  52. Don’t be trapped by what others expect or succumb to their options
  53. Don’t let something that doesn’t matter cause you to lose something that does
  54. Don’t let the noise of other’s opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.
  55. Don’t lose faith. I’m convinced that the only thing that kept me going was that I loved what I did. You’ve got to find what you love. And that is as true for your work as it is for your lovers. Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on. So keep looking until you find it. Don’t settle.
  56. Don’t sweat for small stuff
  57. Don’t let the noise of other’s opinions down out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.
  58. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice.
  59. Don’t make it cute.
  60. Don’t worry about SonyWe know what we’re doing and they don’t.
  61. Early on, Mike Markkula had taught Jobs to “impute” – to understand that people do judge a book by its cover – and therefore to make sure all the trappings and packaging of Apple signaled that there was a beautiful gem inside. Whether it’s an iPod Mini, or a MacBook Pro, Apple customers know the feeling of opening up the well-crafted box and finding the product nestled in an inviting fashion. “Steve and I spend a lot of time on the packaging,” said Ive. “I love the process of unpacking something. You design a ritual of unpacking to make the product feel special. Packaging can be theater, it can create a story. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  62. Entrepreneur, take a bite out of Apple’s innovation so in turn you can bear fruits of creativity. Onyi Anyado
  63. Even when he was barely conscious, his strong personality came through. At one point the pulmonologist tried to put a mask over his face when he was sedated. Jobs ripped it off and mumbled that he hated the design and refused to wear it. He ordered them to bring five different options and he would pick the one he liked. Walter Isaacson
  64. Ever since Apple’s first brochure proclaimed “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication,” Jobs had aimed for the simplicity that comes from conquering complexities, not ignoring them. “It takes a lot of hard word,” he said, “to make something simple, to truly understand the underlying challenges and come up with elegant solutions. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  65. Every child should learn to program a computer because it will teach you how to think.
  66. Everybody in this country should learn to program a computer… because it teaches you how to think.
  67. Everyone here has the sense that right now is one of those moments when we are influencing the future.
  68. Everything around you that you call life was made up by people that were no smarter than you. And you can change it, you can influence it. Once you learn that, you’ll never be the same again
  69. Everything around you that you call life was made up by people, and you can change it. Steve Jobs
  70. Everything is important- that success is in the details.
  71. Everything you’ve ever done in your life is shit,” Jobs said, “so why don’t you come work for me? Walter Isaacson
  72. Finally Jobs proposed Apple Computer. “I was on one of my fruitarian diets, he explained. “I had just come back from the apple farm. It sounded fun, spirited, and not intimidating. Apple took the edge off the word ‘computer.’ Plus, it would get us ahead of Atari in the phone book
  73. Finally Jobs proposed Apple Computer. “I was on one of my fruitarian diets,” he explained. “I had just come back from the apple farm. It sounded fun, spirited, and not intimidating. Apple took the edge off the word ‘computer.’ Plus, it would get us ahead of Atari in the phone book”
  74. Focus on what you are good at; delegate all else.
  75. Focusing is about saying No.
  76. Follow your heart and your intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.
  77. For me it was a serious search. I’d been turned on to the idea of enlightenment and trying to figure out who I was and how I fit into things.
  78. For most of my life, I’ve felt that there must be more to our existence than meets the eye.
  79. For Steve, less is always more, simpler is always better. Therefore, if you can build a glass box with fewer elements, it’s better, it’s simpler, and it’s at the forefront of technology. That’s where Steve likes to be, in both his products and his stores. Walter Isaacson
  80. For the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: ‘If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?’ And whenever the answer has been ‘No’ for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something … almost everything – all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure – these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose.
  81. From the earliest days at Apple, I realized that we thrived when we create intellectual propertyIf people copied or stole our software, we’d be out of businessIf it weren’t protected, there’d be no incentive for us to make new software or product designsIf protection of intellectual property begins to disappear, creative companies will disappear or never get startedBut there’s a simpler reason: It’s wrong to stealIt hurts other peopleAnd it hurts your own character.
  82. Get your mind around it. You can do it
  83. God gave us the senses to let us feel the love in everyone’s heart, not the illusions brought about by wealth.
  84. Great things in business are never done by one person,They are done by a team of people
  85. Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become
  86. Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.
  87. He also came to like the idea of having a uniform for himself, because of both its daily convenience (the rationale he claimed) and its ability to convey a signature style. “So I asked Issey to make me some of his black turtlenecks that I liked, and he made like a hundred of them.” Jobs noticed my surprise when he told this story, so he gestured to them stacked up in a closet. “That’s what I wear,” he said. “I have enough to last for the rest of my life. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  88. He had the attitude that he could do anything, and therefore so can you. He put his life in my hands. So that made me do something I didn’t think I could do…. If you trust him, you can do things. If he’s decided that something should happen, then he’s just going to make it happen. Walter Isaacson
  89. He had the uncanny capacity to know exactly what your weak point is, know what will make you feel small, to make you cringe,” Joanna Hoffman said. “It’s a common trait in people who are charismatic and know how to manipulate people. Knowing that he can crush you makes you feel weakened and eager for his approval, so then he can elevate you and put you on a pedestal and own you. Walter Isaacson
  90. He not busy being born is busy dying
  91. He told her, somewhat emotionally, that he wished she could have seen him when he was managing a Mediterranean restaurant north of San José. ” That was a wonderful place,” he said. “All of the successful technology people used to come there. Even Steve Jobs.” (……) Mona was able to refrain from blurting out, Steve Jobs is your son! Walter Isaacson
  92. He was a man too busy to flush toilets. Mona Simpson, A Regular Guy
  93. He was not an educated man, but I had always thought he was pretty damn smart. He didn’t read much, but he could do a lot. Almost everything mechanical, he could figure it out.
  94. He was short and he had been passed over for the top marketing job at Intel, which I suspect made him want to prove himself. You could tell that if he could screw you, he wouldn’t. He had a real moral sense to him.
  95. Heathkits came with all the boards and parts color-coded, but the manual also explained the theory of how it operated. It made you realize you could build and understand anything. Once you built a couple of radios, you’d see a TV in the catalogue and say, ‘I can build that as well,’ even if you didn’t. I was very lucky, because when I was a kid both my dad and the Heathkits made me believe I could build anything.
  96. Here’s the new applicationIt’s got one windowYou drag your video into the windowThen you click the button that says ‘Burn.’ That’s itThat’s what we’re going to make.
  97. Here’s to the misfits and foolish ones who think differently. They’re not fond of simplicity. They live unconventionally existing at a different level of intensity. They add elasticity and flexibility to what’s inflexibly rigid, bringing warmth to the frigid systems of existence. You can hate them acidicly, discredit their credibility or even oppose them ritualistically. Look down on them cynically, say they became great accidentally, rain on them torrentially or see brilliance academically. You can look and see density or see a lovely symphony. About the only thing you can’t do is disqualify their eligibility. Because they change history. Everything in existence moves them restlessly on to destiny backed by infinity. Their spirit is immensity, they overcome resiliently and follow their hearts existentially. Though they may be misunderstood until the next century, we see their opponents’ adrenaline as only minimally convincing, simply for a time because in them there’s a tendency for the divine to visit earth coincidentally. And while others may see misfits and foolishness we see wisdom and genius because the ones crazy enough to think they can live and love limitlessly are the ones who actually do. Curtis Tyrone Jones
  98. His method for taking the measure of a room was saying something definitive and outrageous—“These charts are bullshit!” or “This deal is crap!”—and watching people react. If you were brave enough to come back at him, he often respected it—poking at you, then registering your response, was his way of deducing what you thought and whether you had the guts to champion it. Ed Catmull, Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration
  99. I always thought of myself as a humanities person as a kid, but I liked electronics,” he said. “Then I read something that one of my heroes, Edwin Land of Polaroid, said about the importance of people who could stand at the intersection of humanities and sciences, and I decided that’s what I wanted to do. Walter Isaacson
  100. I am a fruitarian and I will only eat leaves picked by virgins in the moonlight. Walter Isaacson
  101. I asked them what Regis McKenna was, and they told me he was a person.
  102. I became even more of a believer in providing end-to-end solutions.
  103. i began to realize that an intuitive understanding and consciousness was more significant than abstract thinking and intellectual logical analysis. Walter Isaacson
  104. I bleed in six colors.
  105. I came of age at a magical time. Our consciousness was raised by Zen, and also by LSD.
  106. I didn’t invent the language or mathematics I used. I make little of my one food, none of my own clothes. Everything I do depends on other members of our species and the shoulders that we stand on. And a lot of us want to contribute something back to our species and to add something to the flow. It’s about trying to express something in the only way that most of us know how because we can’t write Bob Dylan songs or Tom Stoppard plays. We try to use the talents we do have to express our deep feelings, to show our appreciation of all the contributions that came before us, and to add something to that flow. That’s what has driven me.
  107. I didn’t want to hurt my [adopted] parents.
  108. I discovered that the best innovation is sometimes the company, the way you organize a company. The whole notion of how you build a company is fascinating. Walter Isaacson
  109. I discovered that the best innovation is sometimes the company, the way you organize a company. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  110. I don’t know anyone who wouldn’t say it’s the most fulfilling experience in their lives. People love it. Which is different from saying they have fun. Fun comes and goes. – Steve Jobs, Adam Lashinsky, Inside Apple
  111. I don’t want to fail, of course. But even though I didn’t know how bad things really were, I still had a lot to think about before I said yes. I had to consider the implications for Pixar, for my family, for my reputation. I decided that I didn’t really care, because this is what I want to do. If I try my best and fail, well, I’ve tried my best.
  112. I don’t have any skeletons in my closet that can’t be allowed out. Walter Isaacson
  113. I don’t have the money for the phone call. They’ve got plenty of money.
  114. I encountered authority of a different kind than I had ever encountered before, and I did not like it. And they really almost got me. They came close to really beating any curiosity out of me.
  115. I ended up spending as much time as I could with him [Kobun China Otogawa]. He had a wife who was a nurse at Stanford and two kids. She worked the night shift, so I would go over and hang out with him in the evenings. She would get home about midnight and shoo me away.
  116. I felt like a dopeI thought we had missed itWe had to work hard to catch up.
  117. I first understood this with the camcorderUsing iMovie makes your camcorder ten times more valuableThat’s when it hit me that the personal computer was going to morph into something else.
  118. I got into it in my typical nutso way.
  119. I got stoned for the first time that summer. I was fifteen, and then began using pot regularly.
  120. I got together the rest of the components, like the casing and power supply and keypads, and figured out how we could price it.
  121. I had a good friend named Rick Ferrentino and we’d get into all sorts of trouble. Like we made little posters announcing ‘Bring Your Pet to School Day.’ It was crazy, with dogs chasing cats all over, and the teachers were beside themselves.
  122. I had a wonderful couple of weeks in Turin, which is this charged-up industrial town. The distributor took me every night to dinner at this place where there were only eight tables and no menu. You’d just tell them what you wanted, and they made it. One of the tables was on reserve for the chairman of Fiat. It was really super.
  123. I had more than a hundred hours, including every concert on the ’65 and ’66 tour.
  124. i had no idea what i wanted to do with my life and no idea how college was going to help me figure it out. Walter Isaacson
  125. I had this crazy idea that we could sell just as many Macs by advertising the iPodIn addition, the iPod would position Apple as evoking innovation and youthSo I moved $75 million of advertising money to the iPod, even though the category didn’t justify one hundredth of thatThat meant that we completely dominated the market for music playersWe outspent everybody by a factor of about a hundred.
  126. I happen to have one right here in my pocketThis amazing little device holds a thousand songs, and it goes right in my pocket.
  127. I hate thatIt sounds a bit poppyIt sounds a bit trivialLet’s call it offHold on, it’s going to be great.
  128. I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: “If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?” And whenever the answer has been “No” for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.
  129. I have my own theory about why decline happens at companies like IBM or Microsoft. The company does a great job, innovates and becomes a monopoly or close to it in some field, and then the quality of the product becomes less important. The company starts valuing the great salesmen, because they’re the ones who can move the needle on revenues, not the product engineers and designers. So the salespeople end up running the company. Walter Isaacson
  130. I insisted they put me in a different school. When they resisted, I told them I would just quit going to school if I had to go back to Crittenden. So they researched where the best schools were and scraped together every dime and bought a house for $21,000 in a nicer district.
  131. I learned more from her [Imogene Hill] than any other teacher, and if it hadn’t been for her I’m sure I would have gone to jail. In my class, it was just me she cared about. She saw something in me.
  132. I naively chose a college that was almost as expensive as Stanford, and all of my working-class parents’ savings were being spent on my college tuition. After six months, I couldn’t see the value in it. I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life and no idea how college was going to help me figure it out. And here I was spending all of the money my parents had saved their entire life. So I decided to drop out and trust that it would all work out OK. It was pretty scary at the time, but looking back it was one of the best decisions I ever made. The minute I dropped out I could stop taking the required classes that didn’t interest me, and begin dropping in on the ones that looked interesting.
  133. I naively chose a college that was almost as expensive as Stanford, and all of my working-class parents’ savings were being spent on my college tuition. After six months, I couldn’t see the value in it. I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life and no idea how college was going to help me figure it out. And here I was spending all of the money my parents had saved their entire life. So I decided to drop out and trust that it would all work out OK. It was pretty scary at the time, but looking back it was one of the best decisions I ever made. The minute I dropped out I could stop taking the required classes that didn’t interest me, and begin dropping in on the ones that looked interesting.”
  134. I never yelled at anyone more than I yelled at Scotty.
  135. I put Adobe on the map, and they screwed me.
  136. I remember telling one of the supervisors, ‘I love this stuff, I love this stuff,’ and then I asked him what he liked to do best. And he said, ‘To Fu*k, to fu*k.’
  137. I saw my first desktop computer there. It was called the 9100A, and it was a glorified calculator but also really the first desktop computer. It was huge, maybe forty pounds, but it was a beauty of a thing, I fell in love with it.
  138. I scored at the high school sophomore level.
  139. I started to listen to music a whole lot, and I started to read more outside of just science and technology – Shakespeare, Plato. I loved King Lear.
  140. I think [the design] sucks. Its shape is not innovative, it’s not elegant and it doesn’t feel anthropomorphic.
  141. I think different religions are different doors to the same house. Sometimes I think the house exists, and sometimes I don’t. It’s the great mystery. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  142. I think different religions are different doors to the same house. Sometimes I think the house exists, and sometimes I don’t. It’s the great mystery. Walter Isaacson
  143. I think great artists and great engineers are similar, in that they both have a desire to express themselves. In fact some of the best people working on the original Mac were poets and musicians on the side.
  144. I think I might have headed to New York if I didn’t go to college.
  145. I think if you do something and it turns out pretty good, then you should go do something else wonderful, not dwell on it for too long. Just figure out what’s next.
  146. I think if you do something and it turns out pretty good, then you should go do something else wonderful, not dwell on it for too longJust figure out what’s next.
  147. I think one of the things that really separates us from the high primates is that we’re tool builders. I read a study that measured the efficiency of locomotion for various species on the planet. The condor used the least energy to move a kilometer. And, humans came in with a rather unimpressive showing, about a third of the way down the list. It was not too proud a showing for the crown of creation. So, that didn’t look so good. But, then somebody at Scientific American had the insight to test the efficiency of locomotion for a man on a bicycle. And, a man on a bicycle, a human on a bicycle, blew the condor away, completely off the top of the charts.
  148. I think the biggest innovations of the twenty-first century will be the intersection of biology and technology. A new era is beginning, just like the digital one was when I was his age. Walter Isaacson
  149. I think the things you regret most in life are the things you didn’t do.
  150. I think the world’s a better place because Bill realized that his goal isn’t to be the richest guy in the cemetery, right?
  151. I thought it was unlikely that Mike would ever see that $250,000 again, and I was impressed that he was willing to risk it.
  152. I thought. This is kind of far out.
  153. I used to be an angry man myself. I’m a recovering assaholic so I could recognize that in Steve. Walter Isaacson
  154. I want it to be as beautiful as possible, even if it’s inside the box. A great carpenter isn’t going to use lousy wood for the back of a cabinet, even though nobody’s going to see it. Walter Isaacson
  155. I want it to be as beautiful as possible, even if it’s inside the box. A great carpenter isn’t going to use lousy wood for the back of a cabinet, even though nobody’s going to see it. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  156. I want to make a dent in the universe
  157. I want to put a ding in the universe.
  158. I was in the parking lot, with the key in the car, and I thought to myself: If this is my last night on earth, would I rather spend it at a business meeting or with this woman? I ran across the parking lot, asked her if she’d have dinner with me. She said yes, we walked into town, and we’ve been together ever since.
  159. I was kind of bored for the first few years, so I occupied myself by getting into trouble.
  160. I was on one of my fruitarian diets. I had just come back from the apple farm. It sounded fun, spirited, and not intimidating. Apple took the edge off the world ‘computer’. Plus, it would get us ahead of Atari in the phone book.
  161. I was on one of my fruitarian diets” Steve Jobs recalled “I had just comeback from the apple farm. It sounded fun, spirited, and not intimidating. Apple took the edge of the word ‘computer’, plus it would get us a head of Atari in the phone book. He told Wozniak if a better name did not hit them by the next afternoon, they would just stick with apple and they did. Walter Isaacson
  162. I was only twenty-two, and I knew I wasn’t ready to run a real company. But Apple was my baby, and I didn’t want to give it up.
  163. I was starting to get stoned a bit more. We would also drop acid occasionally, usually in fields or in cars.
  164. I was worth about over a million dollars when I was 23 and over ten million dollars when I was 24, and over a hundred million dollars when I was 25 and… it wasn’t that important — because I never did it for the money.
  165. I was worth about over a million dollars when I was 23 and over ten million dollars when I was 24, and over a hundred million dollars when I was 25 and… it wasn’t that important — because I never did it for the money.”
  166. I will bring you this section next time.
  167. I would plug each assembled board into the TV and keyboard to test it to see if it worked. If it did, I put it in a box. If it didn’t, I’d figure out what pin hadn’t gotten into the socket right.
  168. I would trade all of my technology for an afternoon with Socrates.
  169. I’d been rejected, but I was still in love, so I decided to start over.
  170. I’d been rejected, but I was still in love, so I decided to start over. Steve Jobs, Steve Jobs Graduation Speech
  171. I’d been very influenced by what I’d seen in Japan. Part of what I greatly admired there – and part of what we were lacking in our factory – was as sense of teamwork and discipline. If we didn’t have the discipline to keep that place spotless, then we weren’t going to have the discipline to keep all those machines running. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  172. I’m as proud of what we don’t do as I am of what we do.
  173. I’m convinced that about half of what separates the successful entrepreneurs from the non-successful ones is pure perseverance…. Unless you have a lot
  174. I’ve been rejected, but I am still in love.
  175. I’ve never believed that they’re separate. Leonardo da Vinci was a great artist and a great scientist. Michelangelo knew a tremendous amount about how to cut stone at the quarry. The finest dozen computer scientists I know are all musicians. Some are better than others, but they all consider that an important part of their life. I don’t believe that the best people in any of these fields see themselves as one branch of a forked tree. I just don’t see that.People bring these things together a lot. Dr. Land at Polaroid said, “I want Polaroid to stand at the intersection of art and science,” and I’ve never forgotten that. I think that that’s possible, and I think a lot of people have tried.
  176. I’ve read something that Bill Gates said about six months ago. He said, ‘I worked really, really hard in my 20s.’ And I know what he means, because I worked really, really hard in my 20s too. Literally, you know, 7 days a week, a lot of hours every day. And it actually is a wonderful thing to do, because you can get a lot done. But you can’t do it forever, and you don’t want to do it forever, and you have to come up with ways of figuring out what the most important things are and working with other people even more.
  177. I’ve read something that Bill Gates said about six months ago. He said, ‘I worked really, really hard in my 20s.’ And I know what he means, because I worked really, really hard in my 20s too. Literally, you know, 7 days a week, a lot of hours every day. And it actually is a wonderful thing to do, because you can get a lot done. But you can’t do it forever, and you don’t want to do it forever, and you have to come up with ways of figuring out what the most important things are and working with other people even more.”
  178. I’m a fruitarian and I will only eat leaves picked by virgins in the moonlight.
  179. I’m an optimist in the sense that I believe humans are noble and honorable, and some of them are really smart. I have a very optimistic view of individuals.
  180. I’m convinced that about half of what separates successful entrepreneurs from the non-successful ones is pure perseverance.
  181. I’m going to find my guru.
  182. I’m going to live in a cabin with Chrisann. ‘No you’re not. Over my dead body’ he [My father] said.
  183. I’m keeping in touch.
  184. I’m sure he was getting some baksheesh, because he took me to this complete dive. I got dysentery pretty fast. I was sick, really sick, a really high fever. I dropped from 160 pounds to 120 in about a week.
  185. I’ve never spent so much of my time trying to convince people to do the right thing for themselves.
  186. If anybody was ever wondering why Apple is on the earth, I would hold up this as a good example.
  187. If I had never dropped in on that single course in college, the Mac would have never had multiple typefaces or proportionally spaced fonts. And since Windows just copied the Mac, it’s likely that no personal computer would have them.
  188. If I had never dropped in on that single course in college, the Mac would have never had multiple typefaces or proportionally spaced fonts. And since Windows just copied the Mac, it’s likely that no personal computer would have them.
  189. If I raise my finger, will God know which one I’m going to raise even before I do it? The pastor answered ‘Yes, God knows everything.’ Well, does God know about this and what’s going to happen to those children? ‘Steve I know you don’t understand, but yes, God knows about that.’
  190. If I were running Apple, I would milk the Macintosh for all it’s worth – and get busy on the next great thing. The PC wars are over. Done. Microsoft won a long time ago.
  191. If I were to die tomorrow, would I be doing what I’m about to do today?
  192. If it hadn’t been for the Blue Boxes, there wouldn’t have been an Apple. I’m 100% sure of that. Woz and I learned how to work together, and we gained the confidence that we could solve technical problems and actually put something into production. You cannot believe how much confidence that gave us.
  193. If today were the last day of [your] life, would [you] want to do what [you are] about to do today? And whenever the answer has been “No” for too many days in a row, [you] know [you] need to change something.
  194. If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I’m about to do today.
  195. If we can rap about their needs, feelings and motivations, we can respond appropriately by giving them what they want.
  196. If we’re not fifty-fifty, you can have the whole things.
  197. If you act like you can do something, then it will work. Walter Isaacson
  198. If you are willing to travel around the world to meet a teacher, one will appear next door
  199. If you can’t connect the Dots, Find the right dots first. Mohith Agadi
  200. if you can’t keep him interested, that’s your fault. Walter Isaacson
    If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on.
  201. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle, Never give up! You’ll know when you find it…
  202. If you just sit and observe, you will see how restless your mind is. If you try to calm it, it only makes it worse, but over time it does calm, and when it does, there’s room to hear more subtle things – that’s when your intuition starts to blossom and you start to see things more clearly and be in the present more. Your mind just slows down, and you see a tremendous expanse in the moment. You see so much more than you could see before. It’s a discipline; you have to practice it. Walter Isaacson
  203. If you just sit and observe, you will see how restless your mind is. If you try to calm it, it only makes it worse, but over time it does calm, and when it does, there’s room to hear more subtle things – that’s when your intuition starts to blossom and you start to see things more clearly and be in the present more. Your mind just slows down, and you see a tremendous expanse in the moment. You see so much more than you could see before. It’s a discipline; you have to practice it. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  204. If you just sit and observe, you will see how restless your mind is. If you try to calm it, it only makes it worse, but over time it does calm, and when it does, there’s room to hear more subtle things—that’s when your intuition starts to blossom and you start to see things more clearly and be in the present more. Your mind just slows down, and you see a tremendous expanse in the moment. You see so much more than you could see before. It’s a discipline; you have to practice it. Walter Isaacson
  205. If you keep your eye on the profit, you’re going to skimp on the product. But if you focus on making really great products, then the profits will follow.
  206. If you live each day as if it were your last, someday you’ll be right. Every morning I looked in the mirror and asked myself: If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I do today?
  207. If you live each day as it was your last, someday you’ll most certainly be right
  208. If you need slides, it shows you don’t know what you’re talking about.
  209. If you really look closely, most overnight successes took a long time.
  210. If you wanna hire great people and have them stay working for you, you have to be run by ideas, not hierarchy. The best ideas have to win, otherwise good people don’t stay.
  211. If you want to live your life in a creative way, as an artist, you have to not look back too much. You have to be willing to take whatever you’ve done and whoever you were and throw them away.
  212. If you want to live your life in a creative way, as an artist, you have to not look back too much. You have to be willing to take whatever you’ve done and whoever you were and throw them away. The more the outside world tries to reinforce an image of you, the harder it is to continue to be an artist, which is why a lot of times, artists have to say, “Bye. I have to go. I’m going crazy and I’m getting out of here. And they go and hibernate somewhere. Maybe later they re-emerge a little differently. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  213. If you want to live your life in a creative way, as an artist, you have to not look back too much. You have to be willing to take whatever you’ve done and whoever you were and throw them away. The more the outside world tries to reinforce an image of you, the harder it is to continue to be an artist, which is why a lot of times, artists have to say, “Bye. I have to go. I’m going crazy and I’m getting out of here.” And they go and hibernate somewhere. Maybe later they re-emerge a little differently. Walter Isaacson
  214. If you’re gonna make connections which are innovative, you have to not have the same bag of experience as everyone else does.
  215. In a bravura demonstration of stonewalling, righteousness, and hurt sincerity, Steve Jobs successfully took to the stage the other day to deny the problem, dismiss the criticism, and spread the blame among other smartphone makers, Michael Wolff of newser.com wrote. “This is a level of modern marketing, corporate spin, and crisis management about which you can only ask with stupefied incredulity and awe: How do they get away with it? Or, more accurately, how does he get away with it? Wolff attributed it to Jobs’s mesmerizing effect as “the last charismatic individual. Other CEOs would be offering abject apologies and swallowing massive recalls, but Jobs didn’t have to. “The grim, skeletal appearance, the absolutism, the ecclesiastical bearing, the sense of his relationship with the sacred, really works, and, in this instance, allows him the privilege of magisterially deciding what is meaningful and what is trivial. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  216. In a bravura demonstration of stonewalling, righteousness, and hurt sincerity, Steve Jobs successfully took to the stage the other day to deny the problem, dismiss the criticism, and spread the blame among other smartphone makers,” Michael Wolff of newser.com wrote. “This is a level of modern marketing, corporate spin, and crisis management about which you can only ask with stupefied incredulity and awe: How do they get away with it? Or, more accurately, how does he get away with it?” Wolff attributed it to Jobs’s mesmerizing effect as “the last charismatic individual.” Other CEOs would be offering abject apologies and swallowing massive recalls, but Jobs didn’t have to. “The grim, skeletal appearance, the absolutism, the ecclesiastical bearing, the sense of his relationship with the sacred, really works, and, in this instance, allows him the privilege of magisterially deciding what is meaningful and what is trivial. Walter Isaacson
  217. In all of his products, technology would be married to great design, elegance, human touches and even romance. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  218. In ancient Rome, when a victorious general paraded through the streets, legend has it that he was sometimes trailed by a servant whose job it was to repeat to him, ” Memento Mori”: Remember you will die. A reminder of mortality would help the hero keep things in perspective, instill some humility. Job’s memento mori had been delivered by his doctors, but it did not instill humility. Instead he roared back after his recovery with even more passion. The illness reminded him that he had nothing to lose, so he should forge ahead full speed. ” He came back on a mission,” said Cook. ” Even though he was now running a large company, he kept making bold moves that I don’t think anybody else would have done. Walter Isaacson
  219. In classic Steve fashion, he would agree to something, but it would never happen,” said Lack. “He would set you up and then pull it off the table. He’s pathological, which can be useful in negotiations. And he’s a genius. Walter Isaacson
  220. In most people’s vocabularies, design means veneer. It’s interior decorating. It’s the fabric of the curtains and the sofa. But to me, nothing could be further from the meaning of design. Design is the fundamental soul of a man-made creation that ends up expressing itself in successive outer layers of the product or service
  221. In order to make the iPod really easy to us – and this took a lot of arguing on my part – we needed to limit what the device itself would doInstead we put that functionality in iTunes on the computerFor example, we made it so you couldn’t make playlists using the deviceThat was controversialBut what made the Rio and other devices so brain-dead was that they were complicatedThey had to do things like make playlists, because they weren’t integrated with the jukebox software on your computerSo by owning the iTunes software and the iPod device, that allowed us to make the computer and the device work together, and ti allowed us to put the complexity in the right place.
  222. In other words, the idea for the iPad actually came before, and helped to shape, the birth of the iPhone. Walter Isaacson
  223. In retrospect, a Nash Metropolitan might seem like the most wickedly cool car. But at the time it was the most uncool car in the world. Still, it was a car, so that was great.
  224. In return for speaking at the retreat, Jobs got Murdoch to hear him out on Fox News, which he believed was destructive, harmful to the nation, and a blot on Murdoch’s reputation. “You’re blowing it with Fox News,” Jobs told him over dinner. “The axis today is not liberal and conservative, the axis is constructive-destructive, and you’ve cast your lot with the destructive people. Fox has become an incredibly destructive force in our society. You can be better, and this is going to be your legacy if you’re not careful.” Jobs said he thought Murdoch did not really like how far Fox had gone. “Rupert’s a builder, not a tearer-downer, ” he said. “I’ve had some meetings with James, and I think he agrees with me. I can just tell. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  225. In the annals of innovation, new ideas are only part of the equation. Execution is just as important. Walter Isaacson
  226. In the broadest context, the goal is to seek enlightenment – however you define it.
  227. In the first 30 years of your life, you make your habits. For the last 30 years of your life, your habits make you. Walter Isaacson
  228. In two days he saw Rupert Murdoch, his son James, and the management of their Wall Street Journal; Arthur Sulzberger Jr. and the top executives at the New York Times; and executives at Time, Fortune, and other Time Inc. magazines. “I would love to help quality journalism, he later said. “We can’t depend on bloggers for our news. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  229. In two days he saw Rupert Murdoch, his son James, and the management of their Wall Street Journal; Arthur Sulzberger Jr. and the top executives at the New York Times; and executives at Time, Fortune, and other Time Inc. magazines. “I would love to help quality journalism,” he later said. “We can’t depend on bloggers for our news. Walter Isaacson
  230. In your life you only get to do so many things and right now we’ve chosen to do this, so let’s make it great.
  231. Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower.
  232. Innovation is not about saying yes to everything. It’s about saying NO to all but the most crucial features.
  233. Innovation is saying “no” to 1,000 things.
  234. Innovation is the only way to win.
  235. Instead of big speakers I bought a pair of awesome headphones and would just lie in my bed and listen to that stuff for hours.
  236. Intuition is a very powerful thing, more powerful than intellect, in my opinion. Walter Isaacson
  237. It doesn’t make sense to hire good people and tell them what to do; we hire good people so they can tell us what to do.
  238. It is in Apple’s DNA that technology alone is not enough—it’s technology married with liberal arts, married with the humanities, that yields us the results that make our heart sing.
  239. It is no longer just engineers who dominate our technology leadership, because it is no longer the case that computers are so mysterious that only engineers can understand what they are capable of. There is an industry-wide shift toward more “product thinking” in leadership–leaders who understand the social and cultural contexts in which our technologies are deployed. Products must appeal to human beings, and a rigorously cultivated humanistic sensibility is a valued asset for this challenge. That is perhaps why a technology leader of the highest status–Steve Jobs–recently credited an appreciation for the liberal arts as key to his company’s tremendous success with their various i-gadgets. Damon Horowitz
  240. It places value on experience versus intellectual understanding. I saw a lot of people contemplating things but it didn’t seem to lead to too many places. I got very interested in people who had discovered something more significant than an intellectual, abstract understanding.
  241. It reinforced my sense of what was important—creating great things instead of making money, putting things back into the stream of history and of human consciousness as much as I could.
  242. It reminds me of my youth.
  243. It started to get very materialistic. Everybody got the idea they were working very hard for Robert’s [Friedland] farm, and one by one they started to leave. I got pretty sick of it.
  244. It takes a lot of hard work, he said, to make something simple. Walter Isaacson
  245. It was a chance to meet a spiritual being and hang out with his followers, but it was also a chance to have a good meal. I could smell the food as we got near, and I was very hungry. He said, ‘You are just like a baby’. I was not relishing this attention. We sit down and he pulls out this straight razor. I’m thinking he’s a nutcase and begin to worry. Then he pulls out a bar of soap – I had long hair at the time – and he lathered up my hair and shaved my head. He told me that he was saving my health.
  246.  
  247. It was a four-bedroom house, and we occasionally rented one of the bedrooms out to all sorts of crazy people, including a stripper for a while.
  248. It was a very big moment that’s burned into my mind. When I realised that I was smarter than my parents, I felt tremendous shame for having thought that. I will never forget that moment.
  249. It was an incredible time for music. It was like living at a time when Beethoven and Mozart were alive. Really. People will look back on it that way. And Woz and I were deeply into it.
  250. It was designed by a famous prison architect. They wanted to make it indestructible.
  251. It was great. I had been listening to a lot of Bach. All of a sudden the wheat field was playing Bach. It was the most wonderful feeling of my life up to that point. I felt like the conductor of this symphony with Bach coming through the wheat.
  252. It was hot, the costumes were heavy, and after a while I felt like I wanted to smack some of the kids.
  253. It was not something she had learned, but it was instead hardwired into her. A human baby couldn’t do that. I found it remarkable, even though no one else did. It was if something in the animal’s body and in its brain had been engineered to work together instantly rather than being learned.
  254. It was profound. It transformed me and many of my friends.
  255. It’s like giving a glass of ice water to somebody in hell” — about iTunes on Windows computers
  256. It’s not done until it ships.
  257. It’s not the customers’ job to know what they want.
  258. It’s one of the things in life I really feel ashamed about. I was not very sensitive, and I hurt their feelings. I shouldn’t have. They had done so much to make sure I could go there, but I just didn’t want them around. I didn’t want anyone to know I had parents. I wanted to be like an orphan who had bummed around the country on trains and just arrived out of nowhere, with no roots, no connections, no background.
  259. Jobs and Clow agreed that Apple was one of the great brands of the world, probably in the top five based on emotional appeal, but they needed to remind folks what was distinctive about it. So they wanted a brand image campaign, not a set of advertisements featuring products. It was designed to celebrate not what the computers could do, but what creative people could do with the computers. ” This wasn’t about processor speed or memory,” Jobs recalled. ” It was about creativity.” It was directed not only at potential customers, but also at Apple’s own employees: ” We at Apple had forgotten who we were. One way to remember who you are is to remember who your heroes are. That was the genesis of that campaign. Walter Isaacson
  260. Jobs had always been an extremely opinionated eater, with a tendency to instantly judge any food as either fantastic or terrible. He could taste two avocados that most mortals would find indistinguishable, and declare that one was the best avocado ever grown and the other inedible. Walter Isaacson
  261. Jobs had begun to drop acid by then, and he turned Brennan on to it as well, in a wheat field just outside Sunnyvale. “It was great,” he recalled. “I had been listening to a lot of Bach. All of a sudden the whole field was playing Bach. It was the most wonderful feeling of my life up to that point. I felt like the conductor of this symphony with Bach coming through the wheat. Walter Isaacson
  262. Jobs had begun to drop acid by then, and he turned Brennan on to it as well, in a wheat field just outside Sunnyvale. “It was great,” he recalled. “I had been listening to a lot of Bach. All of a sudden the whole field was playing Bach. It was the most wonderful feeling of my life up to that point. I felt like the conductor of this symphony with Bach coming through the wheat. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  263. Jobs insisted that Apple focus on just two or three priorities at a time. “There is no one better at turning off the noise that is going on around him,” Cook said. “That allows him to focus on a few things and say no to many things. Few people are really good at that. Walter Isaacson
  264. Jobs obsessed over every aspect of the new building, from the overall concept to the tiniest detail regarding materials and construction. “Steve had this firm belief that the right kind of building can do great things for a culture,” said Pixar’s president Ed Catmull. Jobs controlled the creation of the building as if he were a director sweating each scene of a film. “The PIxar building was Steve’s own movie,” Lasseter said. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  265. Jobs’s intensity was also evident in his ability to focus. He would set priorities, aim his laser attention on them, and filter out distractions. If something engaged him- the user interface for the original Macintosh, the design of the iPod and iPhone, getting music companies into the iTunes Store-he was relentless. But if he did not want to deal with something – a legal annoyance, a business issue, his cancer diagnosis, a family tug- he would resolutely ignore it. That focus allowed him to say no. He got Apple back on track by cutting all except a few core products. He made devices simpler by eliminating buttons, software simpler by eliminating features, and interfaces simpler by eliminating options. He attributed his ability to focus and his love of simplicity to his Zen training. It honed his appreciation for intuition, showed him how to filter out anything that was distracting or unnecessary, and nurtured in him an aesthetic based on minimalism. Walter Isaacson
  266. Join the music revolution with iTunes, and make your music devices ten times more valuableRipMixBurn.
  267. Keep looking. Don’t settle
  268. Learn more and Know more.
  269. Let’s go invent tomorrow instead of worrying about what happened yesterday.
  270. Life is short and we’re all going to die very soon
  271. Mike really took me under his wing. His values were much aligned with mine. He emphasized that you should never start a company with the goal of getting rich. Your goal should be making something you believe in and making a company that will last.
  272. Mistakes will be made
  273. Most of us are latent Steve Jobs! We just need guts to surface. Haresh Sippy
  274. Most people have a regulator between their mind and mouth that modulates their brutish sentiments and spikiest impulses. Not Jobs. He made a point of being brutally honest. ” My job is to say when something sucks rather than sugar coat it, : he said. This made him charismatic and inspiring, yet also,, to use the technical term, an asshole at times. Walter Isaacson
  275. Most people never pick up the phone, most people never ask. And that’s what separates, sometimes, the people that do things from the people that just dream about them. You gotta act. And you gotta be willing to fail… if you’re afraid of failing, you won’t get very far.
  276. Musicians play their instruments. I play the orchestra.
  277. My dad helped me buy and inspect it. The satisfaction of getting paid and saving up for something, that was very exciting.
  278. My father’s father was an alcoholic and whipped him with a belt, but I’m not sure if I ever got spanked. Both of my parents knew the school was at fault for tying to make me memorize stupid stuff rather than stimulating me.
  279. My favorite things in life don’t cost any money. It’s really clear that the most precious resource we all have is time.
  280. My friends were the really smart kids. I was interested in math and science and electronics. They were too, and also into LSD and the whole counterculture trip.
  281. My job is not to be easy on people. My job is to take these great people we have and to push them and make them even better.
  282. My model for business is The Beatles. They were four guys who kept each other kind of negative tendencies in check. They balanced each other and the total was greater than the sum of the parts. That’s how I see business: great things in business are never done by one person, they’re done by a team of people.
  283. My primary insight when we were screwed by Adobe in 1999 was that we shouldn’t get into any business where we didn’t control both the hardware and the software, otherwise we’d get our head handed to us.
  284. My vision was to create the first fully packaged computer. We were no longer aiming for the handful of hobbyists who liked to assemble their own computers, who knew how to buy transformers and keyboards. For every one of them there were a thousand people who would want the machine to be ready to run.
  285. Never let a passion for the perfect take precedence over pragmatism. Walter Isaacson
  286. Nevertheless, by dint of his personality and controlling instincts, Jobs was soon playing a stronger role. He spewed out a stream of ideas – some reasonable, others wacky – about what Pixar’s hardware and software could become. And on his occasional visits to the PIxar offices, he was an inspiring presence. “I grew up a Southern Baptist, and we had revival meetings with mesmerizing but corrupt preachers,” recounted Alvy Ray Smith. “Steve’s got it: the power of the tongue and the web of words that catches people up. We were aware of this when we had board meetings, so we developed signals – nose scratching or ear tugs – for when someone had been caught up in Steve’s distortion field and he needed to be tugged back to reality. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  287. No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there. And yet, death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it, and that is how it should be, because death is very likely the single best invention of life. It’s life’s change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new.
  288. No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life’s change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new.
  289. Non passate la vostra vita vivendo quella di qualcun altro. […] Siate affamati, siate folli. […] Solo chi è così folle da pensare di cambiare il mondo, alla fine lo cambia veramente.
  290. Now he was about to launch the Macintosh, a machine that violated many of the principles of the hacker’s code: It was overpriced; it would have no slots, which meant that hobbyists could not plug in their own expansion cards or jack into the motherboard to add their own new functions; and it took special tools just to open the plastic case. It was a closed and controlled system, like something designed by Big Brother rather than by a hacker. Walter Isaacson
  291. Oh wow. Oh wow. Oh wow.
  292. Oh, I guess you like this stuffIt doesn’t show the productIt doesn’t say what it is.
  293. On Startups: “I hate it when people call themselves “entrepreneurs” when what they’re really trying to do is launch a startup and then sell or go public, so they can cash in and move on. Walter Isaacson
  294. On the day he unveiled the Macintosh, a reporter from Popular Science asked Jobs what type of market research he had done. Jobs responded by scoffing, “Did Alexander Graham Bell do any market research before he invented the telephone? Walter Isaacson
  295. Once a year Jobs took his most valuable employees on a retreat, which he called ” The Top 100.” They were picked based on a simple guideline: the people you would bring if you could take only a hundred people with you on a lifeboat to your next company. At the end of each retreat, Jobs would stand in front of the whiteboard( he loved whiteboards because they gave him complete control of a situation and they engendered focus) and ask, ” What are ten things we should be doing next?” People would fight to their suggestions on the list. Jobs would write them down, and then cross off the ones he decreed dumb. After much jockeying, the group would come up with a list of ten.Then Jobs would slash the bottom seven and announce, ” We can only do three. Walter Isaacson
  296. One more thing…
  297. One of Job’s business rules was to never be afraid of cannibalizing yourself. ” If you don’t cannibalize yourself, someone else will,” he said. So even though an Iphone might cannibalize sales of an IPod, or an IPad might cannibalize sales of a laptop, that did not deter him. Walter Isaacson
  298. One of Job’s great strengths was knowing how to focus. ” Deciding what not to do is as important as deciding what to do, ” he said. ” That’s true for companies, and it’s true for products. Walter Isaacson
  299. One of the talents of the [late] great Steve Jobs is that he [knew] how to design Medusa-like products. While every Macintosh model has had flaws (some more than others), most of them have has a sexiness and a design sensibility that has turned many consumers into instant converts. Macintosh owners upgrade far more often than most computer users for precisely this reason. Seth Godin, Unleashing the Ideavirus: Stop Marketing AT People! Turn Your Ideas into Epidemics by Helping Your Customers Do the Marketing thing for You.
  300. One way to remember who you are is to remember who your heroes are. Walter Isaacson
  301. One way to remember who you are is to remember who your heroes are. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  302. Otherwise, as Dylan says, if you’re not busy being born, you’re busy dying. Walter Isaacson
  303. Out in the back, near the bay, they had a fenced-in area with things like Polaris submarine interiors that had been ripped and sold for salvage. All the controls and buttons were right there. The colors were military greens and grays, but they had these switches and bulb covers of amber and red. There were these big old lever switches that, when you flipped them, it was awesome, like you were blowing up Chicago.
  304. People get stuck in those patterns, just like grooves in a record, and they never get out of them.
  305. People know how to deal with a desktop intuitively. If you walk into an office, there are papers on the desk. The one on the top is the most important. People know how to switch priority. Part of the reason we model our computers on metaphors like the desktop is that we can leverage this experience people already have. Walter Isaacson
  306. People think focus means saying yes to the thing you’ve got to focus on, but that’s not what it means at all. It means saying no to the one hundred other good ideas there are. You have to pick carefully
  307. People think focus means saying yes to the thing you’ve got to focus on. But that’s not what it means at all. It means saying no to the hundred other good ideas that there are. You have to pick carefully. I’m actually as proud of the things we haven’t done as the things I have done. Innovation is saying no to 1,000 things.
  308. People who know what they’re talking about don’t need PowerPoint. Walter Isaacson
  309. Picasso had a saying – ‘good artists copy, great artists steal’ – and we have always been shameless about stealing great ideas. Walter Isaacson
  310. Piracy and online downloads had already deconstructed the albumYou couldn’t compete with piracy unless you sold the songs individually.
  311. Pixar is seen by a lot of folks as an overnight success, but if you really look closely, most overnight successes took a long time.
  312. Plan in Analog — spend time in analog before jumping to digital. Carmine Gallo, The Presentation Secrets of Steve Job
  313. Pretend to be completely in control and people will assume that you are. Walter Isaacson
  314. Put a dent in the universe.
  315. Real artists ship.
  316. reality has an odd habit of catching up with satire. Walter Isaacson
  317. Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life.
  318. Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything – all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure – these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important.
  319. Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything—all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure—these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart. Walter Isaacson
  320. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose.
  321. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart. Walter Isaacson
  322. Robert always portrayed himself as a spiritual person, but he crossed the line from being charismatic to being a con man. It was a strange thing to have one of the spiritual people in your young life turn out to be, symbolically and in reality, a gold miner.
  323. Ron was an amazing guy. He started companies. I had never met anybody like that.
  324. Sculley felt as if he had been punched in the stomach. There was no response possible other than to acquiesce. ” He had a uncanny ability to always get what he wanted, to size up a person and know exactly what to say to reach a person,” Sculley recalled. Walter Isaacson
  325. Sculley found Jobs as memorable as his machine. ” He seemed more a showman than a businessman. Every move seemed calculated, as if it was rehearsed, to create an occasion of the moment. Walter Isaacson
  326. See how simple it is? Your tech folks are never going to do thisThere’s no one at the music companies who can make it simple enough.
  327. Simple can be harder than complex: You have to work hard to get your thinking clean to make it simple. But it’s worth it in the end.
  328. Simple can be harder than complex: You have to work hard to get your thinking clean to make it simple. But it’s worth it in the end because once you get there, you can move mountains.
  329. Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.
  330. Simplicity isn’t just a visual style. It’s not just minimalism or the absence of clutter. It involves digging through the depth of the complexity. To be truly simple, you have to go really deep. Walter Isaacson
  331. Simplify!
  332. So that’s our approach. Very simple, and we’re really shooting for Museum of Modern Art quality. The way we’re running the company, the product design, the advertising, it all comes down to this: Let’s make it simple. Really simple.” Apple’s design mantra would remain the one featured on its first brochure: “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. Walter Isaacson
  333. So we spent a lot of time working with the drive manufacturers to get a consumer drive that could burn a DVDWe were the first to ever ship that.
  334. So we walk over to the car, Woz and me, and I’ve got the Blue Box in my hand, and the guy gets in, reaches under the seat, and he pulls out a gun. So he’s pointing the gun right at my stomach, and he says, ‘Hand it over, brother.’ My mind raced. There was the car door here, and I thought maybe I could slam it on his legs and we could run, but there was this high probability that he would shoot me. So I slowly handed it to him, very carefully.
  335. Some people say, “Give the customers what they want.” But that’s not my approach. Our job is to figure out what they’re going to want before they do. I think Henry Ford once said, “If I’d asked customers what they wanted, they would have told me, ‘A faster horse!'” People don’t know what they want until you show it to them. That’s why I never rely on market research. Our task is to read things that are not yet on the page.
  336. Some people say, “Give the customers what they want.” But that’s not my approach. Out job is to figure out what they’re going to want before they do. I think Henry Ford once said, “If I’d asked customers what they wanted, they would have told me, ‘A faster horse!'” People don’t know what they want until you show it to them. Walter Isaacson
  337. Sometimes life hits with a brick in the head, don’t lose hope”.
  338. Sometimes life is going to hit you in the head with a brick. Don’t lose faith.
  339. Sometimes life’s going to hit you in the head with a brick. Don’t lose faith. I’m convinced that the only thing that kept me going was that I loved what I did.
  340. Sometimes when you innovate, you make mistakes. It is best to admit them quickly, and get on with improving your other innovations.
  341. Sometimes, to relieve stress, he would soak his feet in the toilet, a practice that was not as soothing for his collegues. Walter Isaacson
  342. Stay hungry. Stay foolish.
  343. Stay hungry. Stay foolish. Never let go of your appetite to go after new ideas, new experiences, and new adventures.
  344. Steve Job’s tombstone is flatter than anybody else’s. Niko Stoifberg, Das Blaue Büchlein – 366 Vermutungen
  345. Steve Jobs had a tendency to see things in a binary way: “A person was either a hero or a bozo, a product was either amazing or shit. Walter Isaacson
  346. Steve Jobs thus became the greatest business executive of our era, the one most certain to be remembered a century from now. History will place him in the pantheon right next to Edison and Ford. More than anyone else of this time, he made products that were completely innovative, combining the power of poetry and processors. With a ferocity that could make working with him as unsettling as it was inspiring, he also built the world’s most creative company. And he was able to infuse into its DNA the design sensibilities, perfectionism, and imagination that make it likely to be, even decades from now, the company that thrives best at the intersection of artistry and technology. Walter Isaacson
  347. Steve Jobs thus became the greatest business executive of our era, the one most certain to be remembered a century from now. History will place him in the pantheon right next to Edison and Ford. More than anyone else of this time, he made products that were completely innovative, combining the power of poetry and processors. With a ferocity that could make working with him as unsettling as it was inspiring, he also built the world’s most creative company. And he was able to infuse into its DNA the design sensibilities, perfectionism, and imagination that make it likely to be, even decades from now, the company that thrives best at the intersection of artistry and technology. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  348. Steve Jobs: “The best way to predict the future is to invent it. Walter Isaacson
  349. Steve’s head dropped and stared at his feet. After a weighty, uncomfortable pause, he issued a challenge that would haunt me for days. ” Do you want to spend the rest of your life selling sugared water, or do you want a chance to change the world?”
  350. Take a look at this. You’re going to like what you see.
  351. Take time to learn the closest thing that we have to a SUPERPOWER – Code. Sharen Eddings
  352. Taking LSD was a profound experience, one of the most important things in my life. LSD shows you that there’s another side to the coin, and you can’t remember it when it wears off, but you know it. It reinforced my sense of what was important – creating things instead of making money, putting things back into the stream of history and of human consciousness as much as I could.
  353. Teddy became one of the saints in my life. After school one day, se gave me this workbook with math problems in it, and she said, ‘I want you to take it home and do this.’ And I thought, ‘Are you nuts?’ And then she pulled out one of these lollipops that seemed as big as the world. And she said, ‘When you’re done with it, if you get it mostly right, I will give you this and five dollars.’ And I handed it back within two days. I just wanted to learn and to please her.
  354. That switching power supply was as revolutionary as the Apple II logic board was. Rod [Holt] doesn’t get a lot of credit for this in the history books, but he should. Every computer now uses switching power supplies, and they all rip off Rod’s design.
  355. That’s been one of my mantras — focus and simplicity. Simple can be harder than complex: You have to work hard to get your thinking clean to make it simple. But it’s worth it in the end because once you get there, you can move mountains. [BusinessWeek, May 25 1998]
  356. That’s been one of my mantras — focus and simplicity. Simple can be harder than complex: You have to work hard to get your thinking clean to make it simple. But it’s worth it in the end because once you get there, you can move mountains. [BusinessWeek, May 25 1998]”
  357. The axis today is not liberal and conservative, the axis is constructive-destructive.
  358. The best and most innovative products don’t always win…(it’s an) aesthetic flaw in how the universe worked. Walter Isaacson
  359. the best innovation is sometimes the company, the way you organize the company
  360. The goal is not to be the richest man in the cemetery.
  361. The goal was never to bear the competition, or to make a lot of money. It was to do the greatest thing possible, or even a little greater. Walter Isaac
  362. The goal was never to beat the competition, or to make a lot of money. It was to do the greatest thing possible, or even a little greater. Walter Isaacson
  363. The heaviness of being successful was replaced by the lightness of being a beginner again, less sure about everything. It freed me to enter one of the most creative periods of my life.
  364. The heaviness of being successful was replaced by the lightness of being a beginner again.
  365. The journey is the reward
  366. The juice goes out of Christianity when it becomes too based on faith rather than on living like Jesus or seeing the world as Jesus saw it. I think different religions are different doors to the same house. Sometimes I think the house exists, and sometimes I don’t. It’s the great mystery.
  367. The kids who went to Stanford, they already knew what they wanted to do. They weren’t really artistic. I wanted something that was more artistic and interesting.
  368. The Macintosh was sort of like this wonderful romance in your life that you once had — and that produced about 10 million children. In a way it will never be over in your life. You’ll still smell that romance every morning when you get up. And when you open the window, the cool air will hit your face, and you’ll smell that romance in the air. And you’ll see your children around, and you feel good about it. And nothing will ever make you feel bad about it.
  369. The Macintosh was sort of like this wonderful romance in your life that you once had — and that produced about 10 million children. In a way it will never be over in your life. You’ll still smell that romance every morning when you get up. And when you open the window, the cool air will hit your face, and you’ll smell that romance in the air. And you’ll see your children around, and you feel good about it. And nothing will ever make you feel bad about it.”
  370. The main thing in our design is that we have to make things intuitively obvious. Walter Isaacson
  371. The minute I dropped out I could stop taking the required classes that didn’t interest me, and begin dropping in on the ones that looked interesting. I learned about serif and sans serif typefaces, about varying the amount of space between different letter combinations, about what makes great typography great. It was beautiful, historical, artistically subtle in a way that science can’t capture, and I found it fascinating.
  372. The older I get, the more I see how much motivations matter. The Zune was crappy because the people at Microsoft don’t really love music or art the way we do. We won because we personally love music. We mad e the iPod for ourselves, and when you’re doing something for yourself, or your best friend or family, you’re not going to cheese out. If you don’t love something, you’re not going to go the extra mile, work the extra weekend, challenge the status quo as much.
  373. The older I get, the more I see how much motivations matter. The Zune was crappy because the people at Microsoft don’t really love music or art the way we do. We won because we personally love music. We made the iPod for ourselves, and when you’re doing something for yourself, or your best friend or family, you’re not going to cheese out. If you don’t love something, you’re not going to cheese out. If you don’t love something, you’re not going to cheese out. If you don’t love something, you’re not going to go the extra mile, work the extra weekend, challenge the status quo as much. Walter Isaacson
  374. The older I get, the more I see how much motivations matter. The Zune was crappy because the people at Microsoft don’t really love music or art the way we do. We won because we personally love music. Walter Isaacson
  375. The only reason I shone was that everyone else was so bad.
  376. The only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it.
  377. The Only Way to Do Great Work is To Love What You Do
  378. The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know it when you find it.
  379. The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. Steve Jobs
  380. The people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world are the ones that do.
  381. The people who invented the twenty-first century were pot-smoking, sandal-wearing hippies from the West Coast like Steve, because they saw differently,” he said. “The hierarchical systems of the East Coast, England, Germany, and Japan do not encourage this different thinking. The sixties produced an anarchic mind-set that is great for imagining a world not yet in existence. Walter Isaacson
  382. The problem with the Internet startup craze isn’t that too many people are starting companies; it’s that too many people aren’t sticking with it. That’s somewhat understandable, because there are many moments that are filled with despair and agony, when you have to fire people and cancel things and deal with very difficult situations. That’s when you find out who you are and what your values are. So when these people sell out, even though they get fabulously rich, they’re gypping themselves out of one of the potentially most rewarding experiences of their unfolding lives. Without it, they may never know their values or how to keep their newfound wealth in perspective.
  383. The thing that bound us together at Apple was the ability to make things that were going to change the world. That was very important.
  384. The thing that struck me was his intensity. Whatever he was interested in he would generally carry to an irrational extreme.” Jobs had honed his trick of using stares and silences to master other people. ” One of his numbers was to stare at the person he was talking to. He would stare into their fucking eyeballs, ask some question, and would want a response without the other person averting their eyes. Walter Isaacson
  385. The tooling of this plastic case was going to costs, like $100,000. Just to get this whole thing into production was going to be, like $200,000.
  386. The unified field theory that ties together Jobs personality and products begins with his most salient trait: his intensity. His silences could be as searing as his rants; he had taught himself to stare without blinking. Sometimes this intensity was charming, in a geeky way, such as when he was explaining the profundity of Bob Dylan’s music or why whatever product he was unveiling at that moment was the most amazing thing that Apple had ever made. At other times it could be terrifying, such as when he was fulminating about Google or Microsoft ripping of Apple. Walter Isaacson
  387. Then we went outside and switched all of the locks, and nobody could get their bikes. It took them until late that night to straighten things out. One time we set off an explosive under the chair of our teacher, Mrs. Thurman. We gave her a nervous twitch.
  388. There is a book on Amazon: Destroying cancer (Tumors) with Ultrasound
  389. There was a copy there of Autobiography of a Yogi in English that a previous traveller had left, and I read it several times because there was not a lot to do, and I walked around from village to village and recovered from my dysentery.
  390. There was a hatch in the ceiling leading to an attic which had a huge amount of space. We took psychedelic drugs there sometimes, but mainly we just meditated.
  391. There was just something going on here. The best music came from here – the Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, Joan Baez, Janis Joplin – and so did the integrated circuit, and things like the Whole Earth Catalog.
  392. There were holy men all around. Tents with this teacher and that teacher. There were people riding elephants, you name it. I was there for a few days, but I decided that I needed to get out of there too.
  393. There were some skeptics around who asked, ‘How’s this going to actually sell an iPod?’ That’s when it came in handy to be the CEO, so I could push the idea through.
  394. There would be times when we’d rack our brains on a user interface problem, and think we’d considered every option, and he would go, ” Did you think of this? ” said Fadell. ” And then we’d all go, ” Holy Shit.” He’d redefine the problem or approach, and our little problem would go away. Walter Isaacson
  395. There’s a temptation in our networked age to think that ideas can be developed by email and iChat. That’s crazy. Creativity comes from spontaneous meetings, from random discussions. You run into someone, you ask what they’re doing, you say ‘wow,’ and soon you’re cooking up all sorts of ideas.
  396. There’s lots of ways to be as a person, and some people express their deep appreciation in different ways, but one of the ways that I believe people express their appreciation to the rest of humanity is to make something wonderful and put it out there.
  397. They are making me take all these courses.
  398. They don’t avoid doing the scary thing.
  399. They don’t avoid life’s inconvenient truths.
  400. They don’t blindly accept what they read on the Internet as “truth without thinking about it.
  401. They don’t find joy in people-pleasing.
  402. They don’t judge people.
  403. They don’t let lack of resources stop them.
  404. They don’t limit themselves to a small toolbox.
  405. They don’t live in a bubble of comfort.
  406. They don’t make comparisons.
  407. They don’t make excuses.
  408. They don’t need constant reassurance.
  409. They don’t obsess over the opinions of others.
  410. They don’t put things off until next week.
  411. They don’t quit because of minor set-backs.
  412. They don’t require anyone’s permission to act.
  413. They realized that Woz wasn’t Henry Kissinger. We were at a public phone booth.
  414. They served doughnuts and coffee every morning at ten. So I’d go upstairs and hang out with them.
  415. They were so complicated that only a genius could figure out half of their features.
  416. They would get an engineer from one of the labs to come and talk about what he was working on. My dad would drive me there. I was in heaven. HP was a pioneer of light emitting diodes. So we talked about what to do with them.
  417. They’re the great individual contributors, who never ever want to be a manager, but decide they have to be manager because no one else is going to be able to do as good a job as them.
  418. Things don’t have to change the world to be important.
  419. Think Different
  420. This is where is was and here, next door, is where the auto shop class used to be.
  421. This is who I am, and you can’t expect me to be someone I’m not.
  422. This was not something to think about. This was something to do: to close your eyes, hold your breath, jump in, and come out the other end more insightful.
  423. Those who are crazy enough to think they can change the world usually do.
  424. To YoYo Ma: “You playing is the best argument I’ve ever heard for the existence of God, because I don’t really believe a human alone can do this.
  425. Under Steve Jobs, there’s zero tolerance for not performing,” its CEO said. At another point, when VLSI Technology was having trouble delivering enough chips on time, Jobs stormed into a meeting and started shouting that they were “fucking dickless assholes.” The company ended up getting the chips to Apple on time, and its executives made jackets that boasted on the back, “Team FDA. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  426. Unfortunately his Zen training never quite produced in him a Zen-like calm or inner serenity, and that too is part of his legacy. He was often tightly coiled and impatient, traits he made no effort to hide. Most people have a regulator between their mind and mouth that modulates their brutish sentiments and spikiest impulses. Not Jobs. He made a point of being brutally honest. “My job is to say when something sucks rather than sugar coat it,” he said. This made him charismatic and inspiring, yet also, to use the technical term, an asshole at times. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  427. Unlike other product developers, Jobs did not believe the customer was always right; if they wanted to resist using a mouse, they were wrong. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  428. Was he smart? No, not exceptionally. Instead, he was a genius. His imaginative leaps were instinctive, unexpected, and at times magical. He was, indeed, an example of what the mathematician Mark Kac called a magician genius, someone whose insights come out of the blue and require intuition more than mere mental processing power. Like a pathfinder, he could absorb information, sniff the winds, and sense what lay ahead. Walter Isaacson
  429. Was he smart? No, not exceptionally. Instead, he was a genius. Walter Isaacson
  430. We are put here to make a dent in the universe. Otherwise, why be here?
  431. We at Apple had forgotten who we were. One way to remember who you are is to remember who your heroes are.
  432. We believe people with Passion CAN change the World for the Better.” -Steve Jobs
  433. We believe that 80% of the people stealing stuff don’t want to be, there’s just no legal alternativeSo we said, ‘Let’s create a legal alternative to this.’ Everybody winsMusic companies winThe artists winApple winsAnd the user wins, because he gets a better service and doesn’t have to be a thief.
  434. We don’t get a chance to do that many things, and every one should be really excellent. Because this is our life.
  435. We don’t have a chip to spare.
  436. We kind of missed the boat on thatSo we needed to catch up real fast.
  437. We know about tech, but we don’t know as much about music, so let’s not argue.
  438. We limit how much technology our kids use at home
  439. We made a hundred or so Blue Boxes and sold almost all of them.
  440. We made a lot of assumptions, such as about how many houses would have a personal computer, and there were nights we were up until 4 a.m.
  441. We made the iPod for ourselves, and when you’re doing something for yourself, or your best friend or family, you’re not going to cheese out. If you don’t love something, you’re not going to go the extra mile, work the extra weekend, challenge the status quo as much. Walter Isaacson
  442. We made the iPod for ourselves, and when you’re doing something for yourself, or your best friend or family, you’re not going to cheese out. If you don’t love something, you’re not going to go the extra mile, work the extra weekend, challenge the status quo as much. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  443. We suddenly were looking at one another and saying, ‘This is going to be so cool.’ We knew how cool it was, because we knew how badly we each wanted one personallyAnd the concept became so beautifully simple: a thousand songs in your pocket.
  444. We think the Mac will sell zillions, but we didn’t build the Mac for anybody else. We built it for ourselves. We were the group of people who were going to judge whether it was great or not. We weren’t going to go out and do market research. We just wanted to build the best thing we could build
  445. We tracked down this guy in Santa Cruz who put out this newsletter on Dylan. Dylan taped all of his concerts, and some of the people around him were not scrupulous, because soon there were tapes all around. Bootlegs of everything. And this guy had them all.
  446. We used our small market share to our advantage by arguing that if the store turned out to be destructive it wouldn’t destroy the entire universe.
  447. We were able to build the boards more cheaply than we thought, because I got a good deal on parts. So the fifty we sold to the Byte Shop almost paid for all the material we needed to make a hundred boards.
  448. We worked together on an animated movie, then started going out, and she became my first real girlfriend.
  449. We’re always talking about following your passion. But we’re all part of the flow of history… you’ve got to put something back into the flow of history that’s going to help your community…People will say, this person didn’t just have a passion, he cared about making something that other people could benefit from.
  450. We’re here to put a dent in the universe. Otherwise why else even be here?
  451. We’re the only company that owns the whole widget – the hardware, the software and the operating systemWe can take full responsibility for the user experienceWe can do things that the other guys can’t do.
  452. Western rational thought is not an innate human characteristic; it is learned and is the great achievement of Western civilization. In the villages of India, they never learned it. They learned something else, which is in some ways just as valuable but in other ways is not. That’s the power of intuition and experiential wisdom.
  453. What a computer is to me is the most remarkable tool that we have ever come up with. It’s the equivalent of a bicycle for our minds.
  454. What are the five products you want to focus on? Get rid of the rest, because they’re dragging you down. They’re turning you into Microsoft. They’re causing you to turn out products that are adequate but not great. Walter Isaacson
  455. What are the ten things we should be doing next? …We can only do three.
  456. What do you want to search for? Watch what it can do! See how the interface works.
  457. What drove me? I think most creative people want to express appreciation for being able to take advantage of the work that’s been done by others before us. I didn’t invent the language or mathematics I use. I make little of my own food, none of my own clothes. Everything I do depends on other members of our species and the shoulders that we stand on. And a lot of us want to contribute something back to our species and to add something to the flow. It’s about trying to express something in the only way that most of us know how-because we can’t write Bob Dylan songs or Tom Stoppard plays. We try to use the talents we do have to express our deep feelings, to show our appreciation of all the contributions that came before us, and to add something to that flow. That’s what has driven me. Walter Isaacson
  458. What make you think that if you can’t finish a project in 18 months, you will be able to do that 18 months later?
  459. What was remarkable was that associating with a computer and electronics company was the best way for a rock band to seem hip and appeal to young people. Bono later explained that not all corporate sponsorships were deals with the devil. “Let’s have a look,” he told Greg Kot, the Chicago Tribune music critic. “The ‘devil’ here is a bunch of creative minds, more creative than a lot of people in rock bands. The lead singer is Steve Jobs. These men have helped design the most beautiful art object in music culture since the electric guitar. That’s the iPod. The job of art is to chase ugliness away. Walter Isaacson
  460. What we’re doing here will send a giant ripple through the universe.
  461. What’s this? he asked. That’s marijuana. That was the only real fight I ever got in with my dad. He wanted me to promise that I’d never use pot again, but I wouldn’t promise.
  462. When I moved here, these corners were still orchards. The guy who lived right there taught me how to be a good organic gardener and to compost. He grew everything to perfection. I never had better food in my life. That’s when I began to appreciate organic fruits and vegetables.
  463. When I was 17, I read a quote that went something like: ‘If you live each day as if it was your last, someday you’ll most certainly be right.’ It made an impression on me, and since then, for the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: “If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?” And whenever the answer has been “No” for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.
  464. When I was a senior I had this phenomenal AP English class. The teacher was this guy who looked like Ernest Hemingway. He took a bunch of us snowshoeing in Yosemite.
  465. When I went to Pixar, I became aware of a great divide. Tech companies don’t understand creativity. They don’t appreciate intuitive thinking, like the ability of an A&R guy at a music label to listen to a hundred artists and have a feel for which five might be successful. And they think that creative people just sit around on couches all day and are undisciplined, because they’ve not seen how driven and disciplined the creative folks at places like Pixar are. On the other hand, music companies are completely clueless about technology. They think they can just go out and hire a few tech folks. But that would be like Apple trying to hire people to produce music. We’d get second-rate A&R people, just like the music companies ended up with second-rate tech people. I’m one of the few people who understands how producing technology requires intuition and creativity, and how producing something artistic takes real discipline. Walter Isaacson
  466. When I went to Pixar, I became aware of a great divideTech companies don’t understand creativityThey don’t appreciate intuitive thinking, like the ability of an A&R guy at a music label to listen to a hundred artists and have a feel for which five might be successfulAnd they think that creative people just sit around on couches all day and are undisciplined., because they’ve not seen how driven and disciplined the create folks at places like Pixar areOn the other hand, music companies are completely clueless about technologyThey think they can just go out and hire a few tech folksBut that would be like Apple trying to hire people to produce musicWe’d get second-rate A&R people, just like the music companies ended up with second-rate tech peopleI’m one of the few people who understands how producing technology requires intuition and creativity, and how producing something artistic takes real discipline.
  467. When it came time to announce the price of the new machine, Jobs did what he would often do in product demonstrations: reel off the features, describe them as being “worth thousands and thousands of dollars,” and get the audience to imagine how expensive it really should be. Then he announced what he hoped would seem like a low price: “We’re going to be charging higher education a single price of $6,500. Walter Isaacson
  468. When the sales guys run the company, the product guys don’t matter so much, and a lot of them just turn off. Walter Isaacson
  469. When we disagreed, I would state my case, but since Steve could think much faster than I could, he would often shoot down my arguments. So I’d wait a week, marshal my thoughts, and then come back and explain it again. He might dismiss my points again, but I would keep coming back until one of three things happened: (1) He would say “Oh, okay, I get it” and give me what I needed; (2) I’d see that he was right and stop lobbying; or (3) our debate would be inconclusive, in which case I’d just go ahead and do what I had proposed in the first place. Ed Catmull, Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration
  470. When you grow up you tend to get told that the world is the way it is and you’re life is just to live your life inside the world. Try not to bash into the walls too much. Try to have a nice family life, have fun, save a little money. That’s a very limited life. Life can be much broader once you discover one simple fact: Everything around you that you call life was made up by people that were no smarter than you. And you can change it, you can influence it… Once you learn that, you’ll never be the same again.
  471. When you grow up you tend to get told that the world is the way it is and your life is just to live your life inside the world. Try not to bash into the walls too much. Try to have a nice family life, have fun, save a little money. That’s a very limited life. Life can be much broader once you discover one simple fact: Everything around you that you call life was made up by people that were no smarter than you. And you can change it, you can influence it… Once you learn that, you’ll never be the same again.
  472. When You Need A Miracle, Be Miracle
  473. When you open the box of an iPhone or iPad, we want that tactile experience to set the tone for how you perceive the product. Mike [Markkula] taught me that.
  474. When you open the box of an iPhone or iPad, we want that tactile experience to set the tone for how you perceive the product. Walter Isaacson
  475. When you see a beautiful woman, what do you feel? Ron [Wayne] replied, ‘It’s like when you look at a beautiful horse. You can appreciate it, but you don’t want to sleep with it. You appreciate beauty for what it is.
  476. When you’re doing something for yourself, or your best friend or family, you’re not going to cheese out. If you don’t love something, you’re not going to go the extra mile, work the extra weekend, challenge the status quo as much.
  477. When you’re doing something for yourself, or your best friend or family, you’re not going to cheese out. If you don’t love something, you’re not going to go the extra mile, work the extra weekend, challenge the status quo as much.”
  478. When you’re a carpenter making a beautiful chest of drawers, you’re not going to use a piece of plywood on the back, even though it faces the wall and nobody will ever see it. You’ll know it’s there, so you’re going to use a beautiful piece of wood on the back. For you to sleep well at night, the aesthetic, the quality, has to be carried all the way through.
  479. When you’re young, you look at television and think, There’s a
  480. While some may see them as crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they change the world, are the ones who do.
  481. Why don’t we build and sell printed circuit boards to them?
  482. Why join the navy if you can be a pirate? Steve Jobs
  483. Why nobody, not even his doctors told him about this method? ! ? !
  484. Woz picked me up a few minutes late, and we went to the library at SLAC [the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center] to see if we could find it. I remember we were furiously digging through the stacks, and it was Woz who finally found the journal with all the frequencies. It was like, holy sh*t, and we opened it and there it was. We kept saying to ourselves, ‘It’s real. Holy sh*t, it’s real.’ It was all laid out – the tones, the frequencies.
  485. Woz was the first person I’d met who knew more electronics than I did. I liked him right away. I was a little more mature than my years, and he was a little less mature than his, so it evened out. Woz was very bright, but emotionally he was my age.
  486. Woz was very bright in some areas, but he’s almost like a savant, since he was so stunted when it came to dealing with people he didn’t know. We were a good pair.
  487. Woz would have it in his pocket and we’d go into a dorm… where a bunch of folks would be, like watching Star Trek, and he’d screw up the TV, and someone would go up to fix it, and just as they had the foot off the ground he would turn it back on, and as they put their foot back on the ground he’d screw it up again. And within five minutes he would have someone like this. [Like a human pretzel.]
  488. Yeah, I think I know what it is. I think you [Ron Wayne] like men.
  489. Years later, on a Steve Jobs discussion board on the website Gawker, the following tale appeared from someone who had worked at the Whole Foods store in Palo Alto a few blocks from Jobs’ home: ‘I was shagging carts one afternoon when I saw this silver Mercedes parked in a handicapped spot. Steve Jobs was inside screaming at his car phone. This was right before the first iMac was unveiled and I’m pretty sure I could make out, ‘Not. Fucking. Blue. Enough!!! Walter Isaacson
  490. You can work your whole life for a company that doesn’t care one thing about you. You can work for other people’s success and dreams, and build their future and the legacy for their family. Or you can instead work for your own success and build your way up to the top and leave a lasting legacy for yourself and your family. The Choice is Yours. Jeanette Coron
  491. You can’t connect the dots looking forward you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something: your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. Because believing that the dots will connect down the road will give you the confidence to follow your heart, even when it leads you off the well worn path.
  492. You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future.
  493. You can’t look at the competition and say you’re going to do it better. You have to look at the competition and say you’re going to do it differently.
  494. You can’t connect the dots looking forward. You can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something. Your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. Because believing the dots will connect down the road will give you the confidence to follow your heart. Even if it leads you off the well-worn path. And that will make all the difference.
  495. You cannot connect the dots looking forward you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something: your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. Because believing that the dots will connect down the road will give you the confidence to follow your heart, even when it leads you off the well worn path.
  496. You have to be burning with an idea, or a problem, or a wrong that you want to right. If you’re not passionate enough from the start, you’ll never stick it out.
  497. You have to trust in something – your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life.
  498. You have your heads up your asses.
  499. You know who the best managers are?
  500. You know who the best managers are? They’re the great individual contributors, who never ever want to be a manager, but decide they have to be manager because no one else is going to be able to do as good a job as them. Steve Jobs
  501. You might want to buy us for a few hundred thousand dollars.
  502. You need something more than just the scientific method to explain the world in which we live. Beware of false dichotomies (either/or situations) that proponents of scientism assume. You should never have to choose whether or not you believe in either a plane’s engine or gravity. You can have both. You shouldn’t have to accept the existence of Steve Jobs or the iPhone; nor should you have to decide whether you believe in God or science. Those who insist that scientific discoveries disprove God are mistaken. Jon Morrison
  503. You should never start a company with the goal of getting rich. Your goal should be making something you believe in and making a company that will last. This material may be protected by copyright. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs
  504. You’ll know when you find it.
  505. You’ve baked a really lovely cake, but then you’ve used dog shit for frosting.
  506. You’ve got to find what you love and that is as true for work as it is for lovers. Your work is going to fill a large part of your life and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking and don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you’ve found it.
  507. You’ve got to find what you love. And that is as true for your work as it is for your lovers. Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on. So keep looking until you find it. Don’t settle…
  508. Your thoughts construct patterns like scaffolding in your mind. You are really etching chemical patterns. In most cases, people get stuck in those patterns, just like grooves in a record, and they never get out of them.
  509. Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life.
  510. Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma – which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of other’s opinions drown out your own inner voice.
  511. Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma – which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of other’s opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.
  512. Your time on this earth is limited, don’t live someone else’s life, live by your vision
  513. Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it.
  514. Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. And, like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on.
  515. Zen has been a deep influence in my life ever since. At one point I was thinking about going to Japan and trying to get into the Eihei-ji monastery, by my spiritual advisor urged me to stay here. He said there is nothing over there that isn’t here, and he was correct. I learned the truth of the Zen saying that if you are willing to travel around the world to meet a teacher, one will appear next door.

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