The Da Vinci Code

While in Paris on business, Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon receives an urgent late-night phone call: the elderly curator of the Louvre has been murdered inside the museum. Near the body, police have found a baffling cipher. Solving the enigmatic riddle, Langdon is stunned to discover it leads to a trail …
The Da Vinci Code Cover Image
Language:
English
Publisher:
Doubleday
Publication Year:
2003
Edition:
1
ISBN:
9780307277671
Pages:
480
Link:
The Da Vinci Code
Authors:
Dan Brown

The novel has been adopted into a movie of the same name. It attracted a lot of backlash from some societies and people from India and other countries around the world. It is part of the Robert Langdon series work by Dan Brown.



While in Paris on business, Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon receives an urgent late-night phone call: the elderly curator of the Louvre has been murdered inside the museum. Near the body, police have found a baffling cipher. Solving the enigmatic riddle, Langdon is stunned to discover it leads to a trail of clues hidden in the works of da Vinci…clues visible for all to see…and yet ingeniously disguised by the painter.


Langdon joins forces with a gifted French cryptologist, Sophie Neveu, and learns the late curator was involved in the Priory of Sion—an actual secret society whose members included Sir Isaac Newton, Botticelli, Victor Hugo, and da Vinci, among others. The Louvre curator has sacrificed his life to protect the Priory’s most sacred trust: the location of a vastly important religious relic, hidden for centuries.


In a breathless race through Paris, London, and beyond, Langdon and Neveu match wits with a faceless powerbroker who appears to work for Opus Dei—a clandestine, Vatican-sanctioned Catholic sect believed to have long plotted to seize the Priory’s secret. Unless Langdon and Neveu can decipher the labyrinthine puzzle in time, the Priory’s secret—and a stunning historical truth—will be lost forever.


In an exhilarating blend of relentless adventure, scholarly intrigue, and cutting wit, symbologist Robert Langdon (first introduced in Dan Brown’s bestselling Angels & Demons) is the most original character to appear in years. The Da Vinci Code heralds the arrival of a new breed of lightning-paced, intelligent thriller…surprising at every twist, absorbing at every turn, and in the end, utterly unpredictable…right up to its astonishing conclusion.


Interesting Quotes from "The Da Vinci Code":



  • Men go to far greater lengths to avoid what they fear than to obtain what they desire.

  • History is always written by the winners. When two cultures clash, the loser is obliterated, and the winner writes the history books-books which glorify their own cause and disparage the conquered foe. As Napoleon once said,

  • 'What is history, but a fable agreed upon?

  • Everyone loves a conspiracy.

  • Faith ― acceptance of which we imagine to be true, that which we cannot prove.

  • The Bible did not arrive by fax from heaven. The Bible is the product of man, my dear. Not of God. The Bible did not fall magically from the clouds. Man created it as a historical record of tumultuous times, and it has evolved through countless translations, additions, and revisions. History has never had a definitive version of the book.

  • By its very nature, history is always a one-sided account.

  • Telling someone about what a symbol means is like telling someone how music should make them feel.

  • What really matters is what you believe.

  • Life is filled with secrets. You can't learn them all at once.

  • When a question has no correct answer, there is only one honest response.The gray area between yes and no.Silence.

  • Every faith in the world is based on fabrication. That is the definition of faith―acceptance of that which we imagine to be true, that which we cannot prove. Every religion describes God through metaphor, allegory, and exaggeration, from the early Egyptians through modern Sunday school. Metaphors are a way to help our minds process the unprocessible. The problems arise when we begin to believe literally in our own metaphors.Should we wave a flag and tell the Buddhists that we have proof the Buddha did not come from a lotus blossom? Or that Jesus was not born of a literal virgin birth? Those who truly understand their faiths understand the stories are metaphorical.

  • Forgiveness is God's greatest gift

  • Nothing in Christianity is original.

  • Can you keep secrets? Can you know a thing and never say it again?

  • Learning the truth has become my life's love.

  • Today is today. But there are many tomorrows

  • Authors, he thought. Even the sane ones are nuts.

  • My lawyers will fricassee your testicles for breakfast. And if you dare board my plane without a warrant, your spleen will follow.

  • Those who truly understand their faiths understand the stories are metaphorical.

  • The Pentacle - The ancients envisioned their world in two halves - masculine and feminine. Their gods and goddesses worked to keep a balance of power. Yin and Yang. When male and female were balanced, there was harmony n the world. When they were unbalanced there was chaos.

  • At this gathering [Council of Niceau in 324 AD] many aspects of Christianity were debated and voted upon ― the date of Easter, the role of the bishops, the administration of sacraments, and, of course, the divinity of Jesus... until that moment in history, Jesus was viewed by His followers as a mortal prophet... a great and powerful man, but a man nonetheless. A mortal.

  • Coincidence was a concept he did not entirely trust. As someone who had spent his life exploring the hidden interconnectivity of disparate emblems and ideologies, Langdon viewed the world as a web of profoundly intertwined histories and events. The connections may be invisible, he often preached to his symbology classes at Harvard, but they are always there, buried just beneath the surface.

  • Her eyes were olive green―incisive and clear.

  • The Last Supper is supposed to be thirteen men. Who is this woman?"Everyone misses it, our preconceived notions of this scene are so powerful that our mind blocks out the incongruity and overrides our eyes.

  • Robert wondered if any of Harvard's revered Egyptologists had ever knocked on the door of a pyramid and expected an answer.

  • We fear what we do not understand...

  • PHI is one H of a lot cooler than PI!

  • In which year did a Harvard sculler last outrow an Oxford man at Henley?" Langdon had no idea, but he could imagine only one reason the question had been asked. "Surely such a travesty has never occurred.

  • I would have thought you'd import an English staff?""Good heavens, no! I would not wish a British chef on anyone except the French tax collectors.

  • Napoleon once said, "What is history, but a fable agreed upon?" He smiled. "By its very nature, history is always a one-sided account.

  • The measure of your faith is the measure of the pain you can endure.

  • It seemed Eve’s bite from the apple of knowledge was a debt women were doomed to pay for eternity.

  • Langdon turned to Sophie. "Who is that? What... happened?"Teabing hobbled over. "You were rescued by a knight brandishing an Excalibur made by Acme Orthopedic.

  • There is your truth and there is my truth...as for the universal truth it does not exist.

  • Symbologists often remarked that France-a country renowned for machismo, womanizing, and diminutive insecure leaders like Napoleon and Pepin the Short-could not have chosen a more apt national emblem than a thousand foot phallus.

  • When a question has no correct answer; there is only one honest response.

  • The quest for the Holy Grail is the quest to kneel before the bones of Mary Magdalene. A journey to pray at the feet of the outcast one.

  • Actually, Da Vinci was in tune with the balance between male and female. He believed that a human soul could not be enlightened unless it had both male and female elements.

  • Forgiveness is God's greatest gift.

  • Blinding ignorance does mislead us. O! Wretched mortals, open your eyes! – LEONARDO DA VINCI

  • The Rose has always been the premiere symbol of female sexuality. In primitive goddess cults, the five petals represented the five stations of female life - birth, menstruation, motherhood, menopause, and death. And in modern times, the flowering rose's ties to womanhood are considered more visual.

  • Originally,” Langdon said, Christianity honored the Jewish Sabbath of Saturday, but Constantine shifted it to coincide with the pagan’s veneration day of the sun.” He paused, grinning. To this day, most churchgoers attend services on Sunday morning with no idea that they are there on account of the pagan sun god’s weekly tribute—Sunday.

  • When the ancients discovered ‘Phi’, they were certain they had stumbled across God’s building block for the world.

  • The Lord giveth and the Lord taketh away.

  • The male ego had spent two millennia running unchecked by its female counterpart. The Priory of Sion believed that it was this obliteration of the sacred feminine in modern life that had caused what the Hopi Native Americans called koyanisquatsi - "life out of balance" - an unstable situation marked by testosterone-fueled wars, a plethora of misogynistic societies, and a growing disrespect for Mother Earth.

  • The chalice,” he said, resembles a cup or vessel, and more important, it resembles the shape of a woman’s womb. This symbol communicates femininity, womanhood, and fertility.

  • The Holy Grail ’neath ancient Roslin waits.The blade and chalice guarding o’er Her gates.Adorned in masters’ loving art, She lies.She rests at last beneath the starry skies.

  • Sophie, every faith in the world is based on fabrication. That is the definition of faith—acceptance of that which we imagine to be true, that which we cannot prove. Every religion describes God through metaphor, allegory, and exaggeration, from the early Egyptians through modern Sunday school. Metaphors are a way to help our minds process the unprocessible. The problems arise when we begin to believe literally in our own metaphors.

  • Originally, Tarot had been devised as a secret means to pass along ideologies banned by the Church. Now, Tarot's mystical qualities were passed on by modern fortune-tellers.

  • A little faith can do wonders, a little faith.

  • The Holy Grail 'neath ancient Roslin waits. The blade and chalice guarding o'er Her gates. Adorned in masters' loving art, She lies. She rests at last beneath the starry skies.

  • Good heavens, no! I would not wish a British chef on anyone except the French tax collectors.

  • As we mathematicians like to say: PHI is one H of a lot cooler than PI!

  • Venus and her pentacle became symbols of perfection, beauty, and the cyclic qualities of sexual love. As a tribute to the magic of Venus, the Greeks used her four-year cycle to organize their Olympiads.

  • Transmogrification,” Langdon said. The vestiges of pagan religion in Christian symbology are undeniable. Egyptian sun disks became the halos of Catholic saints. Pictograms of Isis nursing her miraculously conceived son Horus became the blueprint for our modern images of the Virgin Mary nursing Baby Jesus. And virtually all the elements of the Catholic ritual—the miter, the altar, the doxology, and communion, the act of God-eating”—were taken directly from earlier pagan mystery religions.

  • This icon is formally known as the blade, and it represents aggression and manhood. In fact, this exact phallus symbol is still used today on modern military uniforms to denote rank.” Indeed.” Teabing grinned. The more penises you have, the higher your rank. Boys will be boys.

  • Misunderstanding breeds distrust,

  • In which year did a Harvard sculler last outrow an Oxford man at Henley?

  • Most tourists mistranslated Jardins des Tuileries as relating to the thousands of tulips that bloomed here, but Tuileries was actually a literal reference to something far less romantic. This park had once been an enormous, polluted excavation pit from which Parisian contractors mined clay to manufacture the city’s famous red roofing tiles—or tuiles.

  • Professor Langdon?’ A male student at the back raised his hand, sounding hopeful. ‘Are you saying that instead of going to chapel, we should have more sex?’ Langdon chuckled, not about to take the bait. From what he’d heard about Harvard parties, these kids were having more than enough sex.

  • He could taste the familiar tang of museum air - an arid, deionized essence that carried a faint hint of carbon - the product of industrial, coal-filter dehumidifiers that ran around the clock to counteract the corrosive carbon dioxide exhaled by visitors.

  • Unfortunately, Da Vinci was a prankster who often amused himself by quietly gnawing at the hand that fed him. He incorporated in may of his Christian paintings hidden symbolism that was anything but Christian - tributes to his own beliefs and a subtle thumbing of his nose at the Church.

  • The world had gone mad, and in may parts of Europe, advertising your love of Jesus Christ was like painting a bull's-eye on the roof of your car.
    until that moment in history, Jesus was viewed by His followers as a mortal prophet … a great and powerful man, but a man nonetheless. A mortal.” Not the Son of God?” Right,” Teabing said. Jesus’ establishment as ‘the Son of

  • God’ was officially proposed and voted on by the Council of Nicaea.
    every faith in the world is based on fabrication. That is the definition of faith—acceptance of that which we imagine to be true, that which we cannot prove.

  • History is always written by the winners...By its very nature, its always a one-sided account

  • Gentlemen, not only does the face of Mona Lisa look androgynous, but her name is an anagram of the divine union of male and female. And that, my friends, is Da Vinci’s little secret, and the reason for Mona Lisa’s knowing smile.

  • Symbols carry different meanings in different settings. - Robert Langdon

  • Despite for a monumental reputation, the Mona Lisa was a mere thirty-one inches by twenty-one inches -- smaller even than the posters of her sold in the Louvre gift shop.

  • The blind see what they want to see.

  • That is the definition of faith—acceptance of that which we imagine to be true, that which we cannot prove. Every religion describes God through metaphor, allegory, and exaggeration, from the early Egyptians through modern

  • Sunday school. Metaphors are a way to help our minds process the unprocessible. The problems arise when we begin to believe literally in our own metaphors.

  • Mitterrand was a bold man,” Langdon replied, splitting the difference. The late French president who had commissioned the pyramid was said to have suffered from a Pharaoh complex.” Singlehandedly responsible for filling Paris with Egyptian obelisks, art, and artifacts, François Mitterrand had an affinity for Egyptian culture that was so all-consuming that the French still referred to him as the Sphinx.